Keynote Speakers



Michael Goodchild

Michael F. Goodchild

Visit Michael F. Goodchild's webpage

Michael F. Goodchild (Ph.D. Geography, McMaster University) is Professor Emeritus of Geography and former Director of the Center for Spatial Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. After 19 years at the University of Western Ontario, including three years as Chair, he moved to Santa Barbara in 1988. Since then, he has served as Director of the National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis (NCGIA); Associate Director of the Alexandria Digital Library Project; and Director of the Center for Spatially Integrated Social Science.

Goodchild’s research publications, including more than 400 scientific papers and a dozen authored and edited books, have laid a foundation for geographic information science and spatial analysis, extended the development of geo-libraries, contributed to understanding uncertainty in geographic data, and advanced capabilities in location-allocation modeling.

Goodchild is an elected member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is a Foreign Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. He has received honorary doctorates from Laval University, Keele University, Ryerson University, and McMaster University. He is a recipient of many awards, including the Canadian Association of Geographers’ Award for Scholarly Distinction, Association of American Geographers’ Award for Outstanding Scholarship, the Founder’s Medal of the Royal Geographical Society, and the American Society of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing Intergraph Award. In 2007 Goodchild was inducted into the GIS Hall of Fame of URISA and received the prestigious international Prix Vautrin Lud, in France.



Guo Huadong

Guo Huadong

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Guo Huadong (M.Sc. Cartography and Remote Sensing, Chinese Academy of Sciences) is Director-General of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth (RADI), an Academician of CAS, a Fellow of the Academy of Sciences for the Developing World (TWAS), and an Academician of the International Eurasian Academy of Sciences. He presently serves as President of the International Council for Science (ICSU) Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA), Secretary-General of the International Society for Digital Earth (ISDE), and Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Digital Earth (IJDE) published by Taylor & Francis.

He has over thirty years of experience in remote sensing, specializing in radar for Earth observation and remote sensing applications. He has published more than three-hundred papers and fifteen books, and has been Principal Investigator for over twenty major national projects or programs in China, and seven international radar remote sensing projects. He also serves as Director of the International Center on Space Technologies for Natural and Cultural Heritage under the Auspices of UNESCO.

Prof. Guo has been awarded thirteen national and CAS prizes, including National Outstanding Expert (awarded by the State Council of China), Outstanding Scientist (CAS), and the Natural Science Award (CAS). He holds an honorary doctorate from Curtin University, Australia.



Dawn Wright

Dawn Wright

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Dawn Wright (PhD Geography and Marine Geology, University of California, Santa Barbara) is Professor of Geography and Oceanography at Oregon State University, and Chief Scientist of the Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI).

A notable authority in geographic information science, Wright has for the past 16 years teamed with scientists worldwide who use GIS to map and analyze terrains, ecosystems, and habitat. She combines her expertise as a geographer and GIS user to map the seafloor; design geospatial solutions for coastal mapping and charting; and advise organizations on oceanography and fisheries, including her current service on the National Academy of Sciences Ocean Studies Board. She has worked with the GIS community to develop data models and create solutions for analyzing the ocean. Her research interests include ocean informatics and cyberinfrastructure; benthic terrain and habitat characterization; and the processing and interpretation of high-resolution bathymetry, video, and underwater photographic images. She has published eight books and over 100 refereed papers.

Dr. Wright serves on the NOAA Science Advisory Board, and on the editorial boards of eight scientific journals. She is the recipient of the Association of American Geographers Presidential Achievement Award, and also its Distinguished Teaching award. In 2007, the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education named her U.S. Professor of the Year for the State of Oregon. She is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a fellow of Stanford University's Aldo Leopold Leadership Program in science communication.



Rob Kitchin

Rob Kitchin

Rob Kitchin

Rob Kitchin is professor and European Research Council Advanced Investigator at the National University of Ireland Maynooth. His research interests include software and everyday life, open and big data, maps and spatial media, and smart cities. He is principal investigator of the Programmable City project, the Dublin Dashboard, the All-Island Research Observatory, and the Digital Repository of Ireland, and has been the recipient of over 40 research grants.

He has published widely across the social sciences, including 23 books and over 150 articles and book chapters, and his research has been cited over 600 times in local, national and international media. He is editor of the international journal, Dialogues in Human Geography, and has been an editor of Progress in Human Geography and Social and Cultural Geography. He was the editor-in-chief of the 12 volume, International Encyclopedia of Human Geography.

In 2013 he was awarded the Royal Irish Academy’s 'Gold Medal for the Social Sciences' and in 2011 the Association of American Geographers ‘Meridian Book Award’ for the outstanding book in the discipline. He is also the author of four crime fiction novels and two collections of short stories.



Rebecca Moore

Rebecca Moore

Rebecca Moore

Rebecca Moore is an Engineering Manager at Google, where she initiated and leads the development of Google Earth Engine, a new technology platform that puts an unprecedented amount of satellite imagery online for the first time and enables scientists to conduct global-scale monitoring and measurement of changes in the earth’s environment. Rebecca also conceived and leads the Google Earth Outreach program, which supports nonprofits, communities and indigenous peoples around the world in applying Google's mapping tools to the world's pressing problems in areas such as environmental conservation, human rights and cultural preservation.

Rebecca received a bachelor’s degree with honors from Brown University in Artificial Intelligence and a master’s degree from Stanford University. In 2013, Rebecca was recognized by the White House as a Champion of Change for Open Science. Her personal work using Google Earth was instrumental in stopping the logging of more than a thousand acres of redwoods in her Santa Cruz Mountain community.



Rear-Admiral John Newton

John Newton

Rear-Admiral John Newton

Rear-Admiral John Newton, OMM, MSM, CD, was appointed Commander of Maritime Forces Atlantic and Joint Task Force Atlantic in July 2013.

Rear-Admiral Newton began his career in the Canadian Armed Forces in 1983, after an early occupation as a geologist. He enrolled as a Maritime Surface Officer, after an increased desire for challenge and adventure that he was certain he could find in a career that stretches itself through the shifting tides of the world’s active oceans.

In his early years as a junior naval officer, he acquired specialist skills in navigation, communications and operations, and completed tours in the destroyer HMCS Iroquois, the replenishment ship HMCS Preserver, and the frigate HMCS Montreal. Over the years, he has developed a specialty in Canadian maritime sovereignty, gained through countless fishery patrols and three Arctic sovereignty missions.

While every progression in his career has been enjoyable, one of Rear-Admiral Newton’s fondest memories is when he experienced his life-long dream to patrol the fabled Northwest Passage while he was Commanding Officer of HMCS Fredericton from 2003 until 2006.

In 2000, he completed a year of Joint military studies at the Command and Staff College Toronto, followed by advanced military studies in 2004.

Rear-Admiral Newton has served his country on different fronts. He has deployed on NATO missions of the Cold War, and UN peace support operations, including the Gulf War in 1991, Haiti in 1993, and the maritime embargo of the former Yugoslavia in 1995. Of note, in 2006, he served at National Defence Headquarters in Ottawa as Director of International Plans in the Strategic Joint Staff, helping to progress files such as the commitment of the Canadian Armed Forces in Afghanistan and Sudan, amongst others.

Beyond professional duties, Rear-Admiral Newton focuses strongly on his devoted family. He strives to maintain a balanced work-home life, despite the rapid waves of naval responsibilities that consume his time as Commander and require his steady leadership.



Dr. Douglas Wallace

John Newton

Dr. Douglas Wallace

Dr. Wallace holds the Canada Excellence Research Chair (CERC) in Ocean Science and Technology, based at Dalhousie University in Halifax, NS, Canada. Dr. Wallace currently serves as Scientific Director for both the Marine Environmental Observation Prediction and Response Network (MEOPAR) and the Institute for Ocean Research Enterprise (IORE). He is also Principal Investigator of the Transatlantic Ocean System Science and Technology Graduate School which is a partner school with a graduate school (HOSST) hosted by GEOMAR in Kiel, Germany.

Before becoming Canada Excellence Research Chair in Ocean Science and Technology, Dr. Wallace was professor of marine chemistry at the Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR). There, he also served as deputy director and head of the Marine Biogeochemistry Research Division. He holds a Ph.D in chemical oceanography from Dalhousie University and a bachelor’s degree in environmental science from the University of East Anglia, United Kingdom.

Dr. Wallace spent more than a decade working as a scientist at the prestigious Brookhaven National Laboratory in the United States. He has made significant scientific contributions to his field through the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and the US Department of Energy, where he developed the first survey to measure the global distribution of fossil-fuel carbon in the oceans.

Dr. Wallace has contributed to building a number of multidisciplinary research teams, including CARBOOCEAN, a five-year study of the ocean carbon cycle, SOLAS, a global project investigating interactions between the atmosphere and the ocean. He also was one of the initiators for the development of the ocean and atmosphere observatory on the Cape Verde Islands off the West African coast.

His research interests focus on carbon cycle and air-sea exchange of gases.



James Boxall

James Boxall

James Boxall

James Boxall teaches geography and GIS at Dalhousie University. He holds appointments in Marine Affairs, Planning, Earth Sciences, and Information Management, with a love for geographic education and bridging gaps in geo-literacy.

He was on the National Science Foundation Review Panel of the Alexandria Digital Geolibrary project, and is past-president of the Canadian Cartographic Association, the Association of Canadian Map Libraries and Archives, and the Geomatics Association of Nova Scotia.

He is a Governor and Fellow of the Royal Canadian Geographical Society and a member of the Canadian Geographic Education Committee. He received the Society’s Education Medal in 2012 and the Franklin Expedition Erebus Medal in 2015. He is also a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society (UK).

James co-chairs the International Network for Learning and Teaching Geography; is a regional representative on the IGU Commission for Geographical Education; a member of the Canadian Committee for International Map Year; and past co-chair of the Canadian Round Table on Geomatics (NRCan) leading the development of GeoAlliance Canada. He was a lead proponent for the Declaration to Enhance Geographic Education in Canada. He is presently co-editing a book on GIScience Research and Education in Canada, and sits on the Journal of Map and Geography Libraries review board. He is also on the Board of Governors of the Nova Scotia Museums.

As a native Atlantic Canadian his passion is about geospatial information and oceans as it relates to climate change. His two admitted spare-time addictions are twitter (@jamesGIS ) and golf.



Lynn Moorman

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Lynn Moorman

Lynn Moorman (Ph.D., University of British Columbia) is an Associate Professor at Mount Royal University, in Calgary, Canada. Her research integrates both disciplines of education and geography, looking at geospatial literacy, technology use, and the practice of geographic education, both in post-secondary and K-12 (kindergarten to Grade 12) educational environments. Lynn’s experience in the Canadian remote sensing industry and particularly developing the online remote sensing tutorial for the Canada Centre for Remote Sensing fueled this interest in how people think spatially, interpret geographic information, and use geographic technologies. She brings this interest to her teaching, currently offering courses in spatial analysis (Mapping, Remote Sensing, and GIS), spatial innovation (Digital Earth), and scientific literacy in the Departments of Earth and Environmental Sciences and General Education at Mount Royal. Lynn is a Killam Scholar, and a Fellow of the Royal Canadian Geographical Society.

Lynn is active in the geospatial community, advocating for improved geoliteracy and stronger geospatial education. She contributed to the Declaration for Advancing Geographic Education for Canadians, and serves as the Post-Secondary Representative for CGEd (Canadian Geographic Education), the educational arm of the Royal Canadian Geographical Society. She was a founding Board member of the Alberta Geomatics Group, and currently sits on the interim Board of Canadian GeoAlliance, a new integrative national association providing leadership and united voice for all aspects of the geo-community. She is a regional representative for the International Geographical Union Commission for Geographical Education, and a current task force member and past recipient of the Salvatore J. Natoli Dissertation Award for the National Council on Geographic Education. She is very pleased to participate and have the opportunity to raise awareness of Digital Earth through education and outreach events as part of ISDE 2015.



David S Green

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David S Green

David S Green (Ph.D. Physical Chemistry, University of Toronto) has held a variety of leadership and managerial positions related to the use of earth observation data in weather forecasting, monitoring of natural and technological disasters, and disaster risk reduction. He has published extensively in the area of laser-based sensing for environmental and industrial applications. Currently he is the Program Manager for Disaster Applications in the Earth Science Division at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), based in Washington, DC. Here he oversees a global portfolio of applied Earth science research projects and partnerships that exploit space-based instruments, other measurements, modeling and mapping to inform and support decision and actions, promote innovation, and build capacity in the use of Earth observations. His focus on disasters addresses earthquake, volcanic eruption, flood, landslide, glacial melt, tropical storm, oil spill and infrastructure risk. He works with government, academic and commercial organizations as well as international and intergovernmental bodies to promote the open access, sharing and optimal use of Earth observing data. Across NASA Centers David oversees the deployment of capacities and experts during disaster events, and is the advisor on future NASA satellite missions and data management programs including the Land, Atmosphere Near real-time Capability for EOS (LANCE).

Previously, David worked for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service as well as the National Institute of Standards and Technology. At NOAA, he was the Deputy Goal Lead for all Weather & Water Programs, Capture Manager for Emerging Science & Services (Eco-Forecasting, Health, Energy, and Coastal Hazards) and managed both the Science & Technology Infusion and Tsunami Programs. He was responsible for engaging the user community, capturing and documenting requirements (especially earth observations), translating findings to implementing bodies and agencies, and initiating and developing new projects and programs to address gaps and emerging needs.

David is a member of the American Geophysical Union Geo-hazards Working Group and several committees and bodies of the American Meteorological Society. He serves on the Community of Earth Observing Satellites (CEOS) Disaster Working Group and contributes to initiatives of the Group on Earth Observations (GEO), and the Subcommittee on Disaster Reduction of the Whitehouse Office of Science & Technology Policy.



Deren Li

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Deren Li

Prof. Dr.-Ing Li Deren, scientist in photogrammetry and remote sensing, dual membership of both the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the Chinese Academy of Engineering, member of the Euro-Asia International Academy of Science, Professor and PhD supervisor of Wuhan University, Vice-President of the Chinese Society of Geodesy, Photogrmmetry and Cartography, Chairman of the Academic Commission of Wuhan University and the National Laboratory for Information Engineering in Surveying, Mapping and Remote Sensing (LIESMARS). He has concentrated on the research and education in spatial information science and technology represented by remote sensing (RS), global navigation satellite system (GNSS) and geographic information system (GIS). His majors are the analytic and digital photogrammetry, remote sensing, mathematical morphology and its application in spatial databases, theories of object-oriented GIS and spatial data mining in GIS as well as mobile mapping systems, etc.

Prof. Deren Li served as Comm. III and Comm. VI president of ISPRS in 1988-1992 and 1992-1996, worked for CEOS in 2002-2004 and president of Asia GIS Association in 2003-2006. He got Dr.h.c. from ETH in 2008. In 2010 and 2012 he has been elected ISPRS fellow and Honorary member.